Testimonials & Recognition | AiDomes
The following explains about awards & recognition
that American Ingenuity Concrete Domes have received.

 

40' dome on right linked to 30' garage dome.

40′ dome on right linked to 30′ garage dome. This dome home was featured on the front cover of Popular Science magazine & won the award for “Most Energy Efficient Residence in the Southeastern USA.”

AMERICAN INGENUITY DOMES
FEATURED IN MAGAZINES AND ON TELEVISION

An American Ingenuity dome was entered in the Southeastern Home Builders Competition for most energy efficient residence in the southeastern United States. This dome with standard R-28 insulation beat a passive solar home designed and built by Florida Power & Light, a nuclear powered Florida Utility Company.  To view electric bills for American Ingenuity’s 3,700 sq.ft. two office domes, click on cool for less than $85 a month in hot Florida Summer Months.

How did the Ai dome perform during the Energy Efficiency Study prepared for the US Department of Energy?

Superbly. Test findings were released from a year long study prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Florida Solar Energy Center, a governmental consumer agency, in cooperation with the University of Oregon and the University of Central Florida. This study compared an American Ingenuity concrete dome with an energy efficient conventionally built structure and a super energy efficient Styrofoam house designed by Dow Chemical. It came as no surprise to us that our test dome far surpassed both the conventional house and the Dow test house in being the most energy efficient. To view more info on this study, click on US Dept of Energy Study.

Through the years, American Ingenuity Domes have been featured in many magazine articles, books, newspaper articles and television programs.

Television Coverage:

1)    Inside Edition:  On September 11, 1998, Inside Edition, a syndicated TV show led off with a segment on our geodesic domes.  The theme of the segment revolved around the super strength of our domes and how they withstand hurricane forces.  The reporter and two man camera crew first went to Miami and interviewed the owners of a dome that survived a direct hit from hurricane Andrew.  Views of the Menendezes’ beautiful interior were shown but the inspiring stories of the horse trailer and tornado slamming the dome got edited.  They then drove up to our corporate offices.  The segment went on to show our five dome complex including  component panels being made in the factory.  The next stop was to view domes under construction in Melbourne, a 34′ home linked to a 22′ garage.  Also of interest was the interior metal framing and metal floor joists.

The program director had previously asked us for a way to illustrate the domes ability to withstand hurricane force winds.  Short of calling up a 200 mph wind and filming the real thing, the next best option is a computer finite analysis.  The computer simulated a force equal to 230 mph winds.  Our dome stood rock solid.  In fact, to see the movement in the dome, the deflection had to be magnified 50 times.  A square structure was also modeled but it collapsed with 150 mph winds.

A completed dome home was the next stop.  After videoing the house and the dog dome, the reporter, Stephen Gendel, asked for an egg.  While on screen he took his best shot at squeezing it to death.  They departed shortly thereafter knowing that they had a good story and I can tell you with certainty, they were impressed.

About a week after the program aired we got a call from the New York office.  They specifically called to tell us that they had received a flood of calls from people trying to get in touch with us.  For viewers to call us directly they had to figure out the city and area code on their own.  One lady reported that the long distance information operator knew our number by heart.

2)    Film Garden Entertainment of California put together a television program for Home and Garden TV and wanted to include our geodesic dome.  A TV crew spent a day filming our office and manufacturing facility along with two local dome residences.  They also interviewed Michael and Glenda for many hours about the dome concept, manufacturing and assembly of our domes.  The program Insiders List aired in August 2004.  The theme of the program was the top 10 innovative prefab homes throughout the world.  It ranged from “Wee Houses” in the Midwest that were 18′ x 24′ x 10′ to million dollar prefab penthouse modules placed on purchased rooftop spaces in London.  American Ingenuity was privileged to be ranked number 9 on the list.

3)     CNBC and CBS stations.

Magazine coverage:  Major magazine was Popular Science Cover Story in 1987 and a follow up story in October 2010

Newspaper Coverage:  Numerous articles written by syndicated columnist James Dulley;  Florida Today – September 2014, New York Times article. To view NY Times Article click on NY Times.

 Testimonials American Ingenuity dome owner quotes and pictures 

Komarnsky exterior 0144

15 year old – 34′ Dome on full basement in Colorado

Komarnsky kit & 2nd floor 0135

Colorado 34′ Dome’s kitchen & partial view of second floor

34′ Dome on full basement in Colorado which is 15 years old:  Toni told us: “I built the American Ingenuity dome for my retirement home and now that I am retired I am so glad that did. I love my dome.  In 2014 we experienced a hail storm that beat the paint off part of their dome & damaged a vent. There was no damage to the concreted panels. To warm the dome in the winter I designed the windows to face south to let the sun in, I installed baseboard heaters that are heated with hot water and I use propane to heat the water in the boiler.  For back up I have a small gas stove.”  Above are two pictures of her dome.

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Twenty-five year old Florida AiDome Home Built in 1992

Three dome complex consists of 40′ dome home linked to a 30 garage dome with separate 22′ work shop dome (not visible on the right).  In an 8/2/17 Florida Today article, the reporter wrote:

But perhaps one the best selling points, the couple added, is the home’s safety features. Terry explained that the geodesic home is built to endure up to 225 mph winds, and is energy efficient. The couple said they have not paid more than an $80 electric bill since living in the home. 

“We’ve never had to evacuate (during a hurricane),” said Terry. “And we’ve never had any hurricane damage.”

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Pictures below are of this 45' dome on full basement.

Oliver 45′ Dome on full basement in Missouri – 21 year old dome

Dome Sold in 2011

Building the dome was a labor of love. We had visited your offices and researched every model and floor plans of every kit manufacturer in the US and, as you know, chose American Ingenuity’s kit. It was a wonderful experience constructing it. We appreciate all the guidance and support we received from you folks. We are available for testimonials and recommendations to any and all interested parties. Ralph Oliver. To view more pictures of their dome, please click on Oliver dome.

 

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Charles exterior

Charles 40ft Dome

Charles living pic1Charles 40′ Dome in Pennsylvania

One of American Ingenuity’s Pennsylvania Dome Owners Roger & Jeanne Charles installed radiant floor system in their basement and dome first floor.   To view pictures of their dome, please click on Charles Dome

This a quote from them and above are two pictures.

“We live in the mountains of PA. The winters up here can be brutal. Our Ai Dome is a 40ft with Link on a 9” livable basement. {Den, Office/Computer room, Kitchenette} The entire interior, to include the mechanical room, is heated and cooled by a GeoThermal, Water furnace, Radiant floor system.

Our zone controllers are set on 74 degrees winter and summer. Our sole power source, at present, is the grid. Our costs per month range from $99 to a high of $120. We were amazed that our cost now are less than when we lived in a 14 by 73 ft mobile home while building the Dome.

Our decision to build an American Ingenuity Dome home was the best decision we have ever made.”

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Whaley good kitchen Pic034

Whaley 34′ dome kitchen view. 

From R. Whaley, Florida: “Once the dome is initially heated or cooled, the temperature remains constant. Just think of when you take your soda pop to the beach on the hottest day of the year in an inch thick foam cooler. Once the house gets cool or hot as desired, it retains that temperature and stays constant.” In 2004 their dome went through two hurricanes. The following is their comments on the storms: “We live in a 34′ dome one block from the ocean. Our domes went through Hurricane Frances and the exit winds of Hurricane Charley. During the hurricane we could hear things hitting the domes. In the morning we walked around the yard and picked up shingles and soffits from other people’s houses and washed off our driveway. It was as if nothing had happened at all.” (34′ dome home and 27′ dome garage)

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From the Mathes, Florida: Their 34′ dome home with 30′ garage dome utilize a solar water heater and photovoltaic panels to power their lights and refrigerator. Although, their A/C, washer, well pump and TV are still connected to the meter, their total electric bill was less than $150.00 for the year. The owner/builder also states, “This has been a wonderful experience that I would not trade for ANYTHING!”

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Exterior solar Pineapple garage

34′ dome linked to 22′ one car garage dome – 12 year old domes.

Interior kitchen island 34' Pineapple

34′ dome kitchen built on entryway wall

From G. Busick, Florida: “During the hot summer months (May thru August), we can cool a 1,075 sq.ft. dome for less than $27 a month. We maintain an interior temperature of 76 degrees when home and 79 degrees when not.  To view electric bills & other 34 dome pics, click on Energy Efficient.

During Hurricane Jeanne, our neighborhood had 80 mph winds. The Ai domes had no damage, but a neighbor across the street lost her roof.. The entire interior of her house had to be replaced due to water damage.” (34′ dome home and 22′ garage dome) See info on Hurricanes.

 

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Exterior harlock showing both domes cor gb

 40′ dome linked to 30′ Garage Dome – 30 year old domes.

Interior dining room screen dome patio

From M. Ferral, Florida:  dining room in 40′ dome.  All electric home.  Three bedroom two bath 40′ dome average summer AC costs is less than $50.  I-95 abuts the back of this property.  When sliding doors are closed cannot hear traffic.  These domes won the award for “Most Energy Efficient Residence in the Southeastern USA.”

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Front

48 foot diameter (48 Delta 22 floor plan) approximately 2,600 sq. ft.

three bedroom, two bath American Ingenuity two story,

steel reinforced concrete dome home in Edgewater Florida.

Per Eric, “The Dome is very efficient and strong. It has been hit by several hurricanes and tropical storms with no damage at all. My neighbor’s conventional house was severely damaged by the storms. I keep the house at 72 degrees in the summer and warmer in winter. My electric bill is around $100 a month with no water/sewer bill because I’m on well/septic. The house is designed for very little maintenance.”

Features of the dome:
1. 3 ton 13 seer central AC system.
2. All windows are 7/8 low e argon filled dual pane glass.
3. The 10 foot sliding door is 1 inch low e argon filled.
4. The concrete exterior is painted with elastomeric paint.
5. Has 4 skylights and a transom window…all low e.

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From the Sparrows, Florida Keys: “We call our home ‘Sparrows’ Nest’…it’s pretty strong. It may look small from the outside, but…there’s a lot of room. The house is a rock.” (30′)

From the Clarks and Sayles, Ft Pierce Florida: “The eye wall of Hurricane Frances sat on us for two hours so the category 2 hurricane did category 3 damage. We experienced 120 to 130 mph winds with no dome damage while the house across the street lost most of its shingles.”

From the Woods,  Florida: “We were in the direct path of Hurricane Charley. We had winds greater than 145 mph and our dome had no problems. One widow got a crack from debris. Most of our town was destroyed and all three area hospitals had roof damage. Thank you for our dome.” (40′ dome and 27′ garage dome)

From the Vandebergs and Delongs, North Ft. Meyers Florida: “Thank you for our dome. The eye of Hurricane Charley passed only 15 miles from our dome. We had 117 mph sustained winds. Our domes stood strong. The only vulnerable part was our garage door. We used 2×4’s, plywood and sandbags to keep it from blowing in.” (34′ dome and 27′ garage dome)

From the Drybolas, Milton Florida: “Our neighborhood looked like a war zone. We were in the direct path of Hurricane Ivan and had the full blast of the winds plus there was a tornado in our area. Our concrete domes were wonderful and suffered no damage, despite winds of over 135 mph. Pine trees were stripped of bark and needles and many were lying on a 45 degree angle. Firefighters came by our dome and told us ‘You have the right house for this storm.’ We’ve had over 200 people stop by and see our dome. Believe me your product has never been shown off as good! Wish more people by the beaches, who lost everything would come by, sure wouldn’t have to worry anymore.” (45′ and 30′ with 34′ screen dome)

From the Hendersons, Santa Rosa Beach Florida: “We had over 135 mph winds from Hurricane Ivan and our domes suffered no damage. Our domes are close to the Gulf and sit about 56′ above sea level. This is higher than the surrounding houses so we received the maximum of any wind force, yet we received no damage. (48′ and 34′)

From L. Sawh, Florida: “It’s hard to believe, but we finally finished this house of ours! It’s taken us a good year and a half but its all been worth the hard work and challenges. We began with some designs on paper, added some features of our own, took a few suggestions from other dome owners and with a lot of sweat and pain, not forgetting our subs and the folks at the bank, here we are!!!” (40′ and 27′ Garage dome)

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From R. Napolitan, Idaho: “The dome is snug and warm. We heat it mostly with a woodstove that’s in the basement. Our staircases are open so the heat rises. It stays about 68 degrees without much effort, with our lowest outside temp…5-6 degrees. (2,000+ sq.ft. with basement, 34′)

From B. Gates, Illinois: “I’ve never been too much of a conventional person. I thought this was a pretty neat design, very energy-efficient. I like to keep things environmentally nice. It’s almost an organic feeling, being surrounded by curves instead of by rectangles. It seems to be a more relaxing environment to be in.” (48′)

From D. Partlow, Indiana: “The dome is ‘awesome’, ‘beautiful’ and ‘breathtaking’. At least that’s what visitors say. It is and it’s also a very comfortable home to live in. Our June electric bill was $107, we are total electric! We still love the house and the great savings on energy!!!” (2,400+ sq.ft.; 48′)

From S. Mumphrey, Louisiana: “We’re three years in our dome…we still pinch ourselves every morning thinking its a dream. But, it’s REAL and we love it.” (45′)

From L. Gillis, Michigan: “I don’t see how a city can ignore one of the great architectural breakthroughs of the 20th Century. A city without geodesic domes, is not thinking about progress. It’s thinking about replicating the past. A city cannot be a world-class city, unless it has some geodesic domes.” (45′)

From H. Willis, Mississippi: “I like the openness. You can see the kitchen, dining room, living room and bedroom loft when you walk in the front door.” (34′ with 25′ screen dome)

From L. Covington, North Carolina: “Doing everything on my own, not too bad when I think that it will save me $25,000 in labor costs for doing everything outside and inside….The folks that ride by are trying to break their necks gawking at the dome. A curiosity for folks I guess and a few have stopped for more info and a lot come back from time to time to check the progress….” (30′)

From J. Chang: “Thank you again for being the great company that you are! Keep us in the loop with information on finishing touches.” (48′)

From K. Millar, South Carolina: “What this house is about is alternatives.  We decorated it with an Oriental theme, even painting the floor with an Asian motif and we surrounded the house with a Japanese garden.” (40′)

From R. Scripps, Texas: “I like to thank you again for the advice you have given me and Dale.” (Two 45′ domes on full basements)

From J. Holden, Texas: “We just love our four domes, even after 15 years!” (40′)

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RayMesa Snow-4

Utah 45′ Dome Home linked to 30′ Garage Dome

 

16.40 custom RayMesa-interior3

Utah 45′ Dome Home Living Room

From J. Collar, Utah: “My wife, Mary, devoured articles and books about straw bale, rammed earth, poured adobe, earthships, log, and any other unconventional building systems. Finally, Mary announced to me that she had found our house; a precast concrete and eps geodesic dome kit! Although I wasn’t wild about the look of a dome house, as an engineer I was excited about the sheer practicality. I quickly ran some heat loss calculations and found that at -20 degrees F, we could expect to keep the 2700 sq.ft. of living space at 70 degrees F using little more than 30,000 btuh, about 1/3 the size of a conventional home furnace. With judicious use of a large solar window and a masonry heater fireplace, we could limit our use of propane for backup heating.” (45′ and 30′ Garage dome)  

Jim Collar’s Utah Ai concrete dome buildings operate off the grid by using photovoltaic’s, masonry heater fireplace and passive solar water tubes. To learn more, click on Off the Grid.

  • Future Stuff

  • Xtreme Houses by Courtenay Smith & Sean Topham. Prestel Verlag offices are in Munich, Berlin, London, New York 2002

 NEWSPAPER COVERAGE ON AMERICAN INGENUITY CONCRETE DOMES

In the past such newspapers as Florida Today, Detroit News, New York Times, Florida Keys Sunday, Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen Times), International Herald Tribune in Hong Kong have run articles on American Ingenuity Domes.   To view an 8/2/17 article on domes built in Canaveral Groves Florida,  please view our home page, upper right icon.  

NEW YORK TIMES

The Dome Gains Weight and Settles Down

BRUCE NELKIN decided in the 10th grade that he would someday live in a geodesic dome, after seeing a picture of one in a science book. “It looked like something out of ‘Star Wars,’ ” Mr. Nelkin said. “I thought it was the coolest thing I’d ever seen, and I said to myself, ‘When I grow up I’m going to build one of those.’ ”

Enlarge This Image

Jeff Topping for The New York Times

SUPERSIZE Houses like John and Cindy Schofield’s in Arizona are defying the countercultural image of the dome.

Multimedia

The Geodesic Dome

The Geodesic Dome

In 2003 he finally did. Now Mr. Nelkin, 45, an Internet marketer, and his wife, Deana, live in a house made of two adjoining domes in Pleasantville, N.Y.

The pale gray hemispheres stand out like twin spaceships on a tree-lined street where all the other houses have pitched roofs. But inside, the house looks unexpectedly terrestrial, with overstuffed couches, hardwood floors and rustic fireplaces much like those of its neighbors.

The Nelkins are among a growing group of Americans who are building dream homes in the shape of geodesic domes, once a symbol of youthful rebellion but now one of aspiration for aging baby boomers.

Hemispheres are sprouting up among the mock Tudors and colonials of upscale neighborhoods across the country, from Veneta, Ore., where a company called Oregon Dome is building a development of 2,000-square-foot spec domes on suburban lots for around $200,000 each. Like tofu and yoga, the dome has evolved from countercultural funkiness to middle-class respectability.

First popularized in the 1950s by the designer and inventor Buckminster Fuller, who died in 1983, geodesic domes have long been appreciated by environmentalists for their energy efficiency and the way they provide the maximum amount of space with a minimum of material. In the 1960s and ’70s, hippies built them in the wilderness, painting them in psychedelic patchworks; their rounded contours were seen as a retort to all things square or right-angled in Western society.

The domes of the Flower Power era were rarely more than a standard 24 feet in diameter and cost less than $1,000 to build, according to Jay Baldwin, an early dome builder and dweller. But many new domes are sprawling mansions of more than 10,000 square feet, built on budgets of a million dollars or more.

“The domes have gotten bigger and more expensive as people’s incomes expanded,” said Dennis Johnson, who founded Natural Spaces Domes, a dome building company in North Branch, Minn., in 1978. In the past decade his clients have quadrupled in number, to about 200 a year.

Like most modern homeowners, dome owners want plenty of space.

“They want another bedroom,” said Robert Singer, the president of Timberline Geodesics, a dome manufacturer in Berkeley, Calif. “They want the home office, they want the entertainment room, they want the extra space in the basement, they want the large custom kitchen.”

Two years ago, Mr. Singer said, his factory needed to run only seven months a year to meet the demand. Now it operates full time to produce more than 50 houses annually, and he still can’t fill all the orders.

Many people are also requesting surprisingly conventional architectural accessories: dormer windows, cedar shingles, carriage lamps, gambrel-roofed entryways.

They want to stand out from the pack, it seems, but not too much; they want to reclaim their youth, but aren’t willing to sacrifice the comforts of middle age. (Mr. Nelkin put a cupola on top of his dome, because, he said, it made the place look “more homey” and less like the kind of basic unembellished dome “you might see in an oil refinery.”)

Companies that sell kits for large-scale domes offer custom options like cupolas, balconies, rectangular additions for extra rooms and even matching minidomes for pets. But early dome builders like Mr. Baldwin see the new customized domes as bastardizations of Fuller’s concept.

“I call them elephant droppings,” he said. “Fuller’s idea was that of a machine-made object, a pure geometry.”

Most dome dwellers are not so picky.

Tina Gerard and Wes Dehnke, who own a 45-foot-diameter dome in River Falls, Wis., love its shape and the triangular framing inside. But when they were planning it they thought the outside looked too naked.

Not anymore.

“The castle turrets give the dome a whole other dimension,” Ms. Gerard said.

 

THE FLORIDA KEYS SUNDAY
8.18 Exterior pilings2 Mowery platform-edited2

The Keys Sunday Newspaper: Article By STEVE SANOSKI

Imagine a home designed so efficiently it saves upwards of 70 percent on monthly utility bills, and built with materials strong enough to withstand a direct hit from a major hurricane. 

What would such a house look like? Sort of like a half of an egg. But more specifically, a home with those capabilities would have to be a geodesic dome. 

“It’s the most simplified way to build a house that we know of,” said Glenda Busick, coowner of dome home manufacturer American Ingenuity. “It’s a very logical option for people living on the coast.” 

Rockledge, Florida-based American Ingenuity has been manufacturing dome home kits since 1976. Since then they’ve shipped their kits to 46 states – including Alaska and Hawaii – as well the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and even Israel. 

The dome’s shape gets the credit for the large savings on energy expenses, said Busick. Dome houses have about half the total surface area as a conventional home, meaning there’s less space for hot or cold air to escape.

“Nationwide, that’s the number one reason people buy our home kits,” she said. “It’s common for our customers to save 50 to 70 percent on their heating and cooling costs due to the thick insulated panels we use and the natural shape of the dome.”

The number one reason Floridians purchase American Ingenuity dome home kits is the structure’s incredible resistance to hurricanes, said Busick.

“We have customers in Miami who survived a direct hit from (category 5) Hurricane Andrew,” she said. “We guarantee all of our homes against 225 mph winds and F4 tornadoes.” 

A geodesic dome is created out of a network of struts Shape offers energy savings, hurricane resistance. Dome homes make comeback arranged on great circles (geodesics) on the surface of a sphere. The geodesics intersect to form triangular elements that have great rigidity but they also distribute the stress across the entire structure. 

According to online encyclopedia Wikipedia, it is the only man-made structure that gets proportionally stronger as it increases in size. When completed to form a full sphere, it is known as a geodesic sphere. 

Though not invented by him, the dome was popularized by R. Buckminster Fuller who named the dome “geodesic.” 

The standard dome home design will resist 225 mph winds, F4 Tornados and 50-pound snow loads. American Ingenuity dome houses get their strength from two sources: the aerodynamic design of the dome and the patented wall panel design used on all kit homes. 

The sandwich panel is polystyrene insulation at the core, covered by steel mesh and reinforced with concrete seams. 

The prefabricated panel was developed and patented by American Ingenuity’s founder, Michael Busick, in 1984.

However, that price is only for the dome shell kit, and does not include windows, doors or any furnishings, such as flooring, kitchen cabinets, lighting and bathroom fixtures. 

Additional costs can also be associated with assembling the house kit, which about half the American Ingenuity customers do themselves. “A lot of people see how inexpensive the kit is and assume the whole house when completed will be inexpensive,” Busick said. “That’s not true. A finished dome will cost about the same as a conventional home, but what you end up with is much more than a conventional home.” 

The popularity of geodesic dome houses is on the rise in Florida and throughout the county, said Busick. 

“Five years ago we might sell 25 dome homes a year,” she said. “Now we’re selling 60 to 70 kits a year, and it just continues to grow.” 

The Florida Keys is home to one dome currently, located in Key Largo, and it happens to be up for sale. The asking price for the 40’, two-story, three bedroom dome home on oceanfront property is just below $2.2 million. 

For more information about American Ingenuity dome home kits, including full listing details on the Key Largo home for sale, visit www.aidomes.com.

 

  • A cover story in Popular Science in March 1987

  • Builder Dealer Magazine in November 1987

  • Ambassador Magazine for Trans World Airlines in May 1990

  • American Survival Guide magazine in January 1991 and September 1995

  • Aberdeen’s Concrete Construction magazine in March 1996

  • Home Power magazine in June/July 1998

 

Exterior Schoonover side front view 3

American Ingenuity 40′ dome home featured on Film Garden Entertainment

Film Garden Entertainment of California put together a television program for Home and Garden TV and wanted to include our geodesic dome.  A TV crew spent a day filming our office and manufacturing facility along with two local dome residences.  They also interviewed Michael and Glenda for many hours about the dome concept, manufacturing and assembly of our domes.  The program Insiders List aired in August 2004.  The theme of the program was the top 10 innovative prefab homes throughout the world.  It ranged from “Wee Houses” in the Midwest that were 18′ x 24′ x 10′ to million dollar prefab penthouse modules placed on purchased rooftop spaces in London.  American Ingenuity was privileged to be ranked number 9 on the list.

 

Different angle of above 40 ' dome linked to 30 garage dome.  Solar panel on top of link.

40 ‘ dome linked to 30 garage dome on Inside Edition.

 Inside Edition:  On September 11, 1998, Inside Edition, a syndicated TV show led off with a segment on our geodesic domes.  The theme of the segment revolved around the super strength of our domes and how they withstand hurricane forces.  The reporter and two man camera crew first went to Miami and interviewed the owners of a dome that survived a direct hit from hurricane Andrew.  Views of the Menendezes’ beautiful interior were shown but the inspiring stories of the horse trailer and tornado slamming the dome got edited.  They then drove up to our corporate offices.  The segment went on to show our five dome complex including the component panels being made in the factory.  The next stop was to view domes under construction in Melbourne, a 34′ home linked to a 22′ garage.  Also of interest was the interior metal framing and metal floor joists.

    The program director had previously asked us for a way to illustrate the domes ability to withstand hurricane force winds.  Short of calling up a 200 mph wind and filming the real thing, the next best option is a computer finite analysis.  The computer simulated a force equal to 230 mph winds.  Our dome stood rock solid.  In fact, to see the movement in the dome, the deflection had to be magnified 50 times.  A square structure was also modeled but it collapsed with 150 mph winds.

    A completed dome home was the next stop.  After videoing the house and the dog dome, the reporter, Stephen Gendel, asked for an egg.  While on screen he took his best shot at squeezing it to death.  They departed shortly thereafter knowing that they had a good story and I can tell you with certainty, they were impressed.

    About a week after the program aired we got a call from the New York office.  They specifically called to tell us that they had received a flood of calls from people trying to get in touch with us.  For viewers to call us directly they had to figure out the city and area code on their own.  One lady reported that the long distance information operator knew our number by heart.