decreases | AiDomes

Great News for Florida Customers.  One of our perspective dome buyers has discovered two companies in south Florida who sell Florida approved impact glass doors and windows and shutters at a reasonable price.

The factory for the Impact Glass Windows and Doors is:

Curv-A-Tech Corp.  930 West 23rd Street Hialeah,FL. 33010    curvatechcorp@bellsouth.net     Phone: 305-888-9631

 

The company for Hurricane shutters & Glass is:

DEPENDABLE SHUTTER & GLASS   

Phone: 888-694-6698    Fax: 954.791.0840   4741 Orange Drive, Davie, FL 33314  www.dependableshutter.com

 

Please use this chart for size estimating only. During Plans Design Ai will email elevation views showing possible rough opening door & window sizes.

1st-fl-window-and-door

2nd-fl-window-and-door

From Better Homes and Gardens – what to consider when replacing windows & buying windows.

In older houses, faulty windows can account for a third of the total heat loss in winter and as much as 75 percent of interior heat gain in summer. Look for the following telltale signs that a window has lost its effectiveness:

  • Stand inside your house on a windy day with a lit candle near the window’s operative edge. If the flame flickers or goes out, your weather stripping might be damaged.
  • During the winter, if a window develops ice buildup or a frosty glaze on the interior of the pane, the ventilation in your home may not be adequate. Another possibility is that your window may not be providing enough insulation value, a situation that can make your heating bills soar.
  • Sit near your window. If you feel cold air coming in during the winter or warm air during the summer, your windows have little insulation value. This means you’re paying more to heat and cool your house to compensate for the exterior air entering your home.
  • Do your windows get fogged with condensation? If so, you may have a seal failure and need to replace the glazing or the entire window.

In some cases, replacing broken panes and tending to loose or missing weather stripping may buy some time. If your windows are old and ill-fitting, however, you need more than stopgaps.

Replacement window options:

Wood is the choice of most homeowners. Wood is strong, insulates well, and has natural appeal and a warm look. It needs exterior maintenance, and interior surfaces can be painted, stained, or finished any number of ways.

Vinyl windows do not need to be painted or stained. They offer good insulation value and strength, making them a viable alternative to wood.

Aluminum windows have a stronger frame but poorer insulation than wood or vinyl. They’re fine in areas with a mild climate, and are also used for commercial applications.

Fiberglass combines the higher strength and stability of aluminum with the insulating properties of wood and vinyl. Fewer options are available at this time, as fiberglass is just beginning to show up in the window market.

Combination windows are available with wood on the interior and vinyl or aluminum on the exterior, combining the look of wood with a low-maintenance exterior material. This is known as “cladding” (as in vinyl-clad or aluminum-clad).

Features to consider when purchasing windows:

Energy efficiency. Almost any good-quality window available today incorporates two pieces of glass with a sealed airspace between then as a buffer between indoors and out. Some windows are even triple-paned. You may have the option of argon gas instead of air between the glass to further the window’s insulating abilities. Most window manufacturers also offer such options as low-E glass, which reflects heat and screens out the sun’s rays.

Design. Windows are available in shapes ranging from quarter rounds to ovals. Consider an arrangement of smaller windows instead of one large one, or vice versa.

Ease of installation. The easiest type of replacement window is a frame-within-a-frame design that can be installed in an existing frame without disturbing walls or trim work. Some are sold in kit form, complete with hardware, for standard sizes. If your original windows have divided lights or panes, look for multipane replacements or snap-in grilles that match glass dividers on the old units as closely as possible. If your windowsills are rotting or damaged, however, you’ll need to replace the old frame as well.

Ease of maintenance. Weather-resistant materials will reduce your regular maintenance; vinyl or aluminum-clad exteriors need no painting. For ease of cleaning, choose windows that tilt in or open from the side. Many double-hung windows now come with tilting sashes so both interior and exterior glass surfaces can be cleaned from inside the house.

Function. Tempered glass is required by code for certain applications, such as glass doors and some window installations with low sill height. For more extreme conditions, such as coastal environments, consider laminated impact-resistant glass designed to withstand hurricane-force winds and the impact of airborne debris.

Hardware. Some manufacturers offer improved hardware for crank-out windows such as casements and awnings — specifically, collapsible or low-profile handles that don’t interfere with blinds or other window coverings. Others offer a variety of style options for latches and locks. To be safe, ask about these and any other convenience features before the units end up in your walls. Also, try the hardware in the showroom. Does the window lock, unlock, and open easily? This test gives you a feel for the window’s usability and its overall quality as well.

Cost guidelines:
Broadly, vinyl and wood are the least expensive, fiberglass costs more, and clad windows are even more. That said, a general price range for an average size (30-inch by 48-inch) window is $100 to $200, which will be higher in urban areas.

More features like tilting versions and higher E-ratings increase the cost, although sometimes as the price and quality increase, more options are included. Differences in the up-front purchase price of a window may eventually be offset by other factors. Energy efficiency and a no-maintenance exterior will offset the up-front cost difference over time. Second, installation and labor costs could actually be higher for an “economy-grade” all-wood window, if you factor in charges for painting, and how much sooner you may have to replace it than a window made from more durable material.

One way to keep your window costs from rising is to avoid special orders. Try to work with standard sizes from a manufacturer, and select from the standard styles and features that your local retailer stocks.

 

 

Page under revision – sorry for appearance – will be finished 8/12/15

Suitable Standard Door & Window Sizes

For American Ingenuity Domes

These tables contain CALL SIZES which are the customary size identification of the window industry. Call Size is the actual window dimension, for example Call Size 3/4 x 4/6 expresses 3’-4” x 4’-6”, which converts into 40” x 54”.  The horizontal dimension is always listed first x vertical dimension.  Check with your window supplier as to what sizes are best suited for fire egress windows in bedrooms to meet code.

H = Horizontal Sliding or Horizontal rolling windows

V = Vertical sliding, either double hung or single hung

C = Casement, swinging type window

F = French Door

22′
27′
30′
34’/36′
40′
45′
48′

1st Floor Window Dormer – Replacing a “H” Panel – Suitable Standard Window Size

2/8 x 3/2 V
4/4 x 3/0 V
2/0 x 3/2 VC
2/8 x 3/2 C
4/0 x 3/2 H
5/0 x 3/2 H
5/0 x 3/2 H
3/0 x 3/2 H
4/8 x 3/2 H
2/4 x 3/0 C
3/0 x 3/2 C
RO- 3/6 x 2/5 C
5/0 x 3/0 H
6/0 x 3/0 H
3/8 x 3/0 H
5/0 x 3/0 H
3/0 x 3/0 VH
RO – 2/5 x 3/6 C

1st Floor Window Dormer – Replacing a “P” Panel – Suitable Standard Window Size

NA
4/0 x 3/0 H
NA
NA
RO – 2/5 x 3/6 C
3/0 x 3/2 C
4/4 x 3/2 V
4/0 x 3/0 H
RO – 3/6 x 2/5 C
3/8 x 3/2 HV
4/8 x 3/2 H
3/0 x 3/2 C
3/4 x 3/0 HV
4/0 x 3/0 H
 

1st Floor Door Dormer – Replacing “H” or “P” Panels  – Suitable Standard Door Size

RED – “H” GREEN – “P”

22′

3/0″ x 6/8

27′
 
5/0″ x 6/8 F
30′
 
custom
34′ & 36′
 
2/6″ x 6/8
40′
 
3/0″ x 6/8
45′
 
5/0″ x 6/8 F
48′
 
5/0″ x 6/8 F
2/6″ x 6/8
3/0″ x 6/8
NA
NA
2/8″ x 6/8
3/0″ x 6/8
3/0″ x 6/8

2nd Floor Window Dormer – Recommended Window Sizes.  Window height is based on 7’6″ first floor ceiling height in the 22′, 27′, 30′ & 34′ domes.  Window height is based on 8′ ceilings on the first floor for the 36′ or larger domes. Both are based on 2×10 second floor framing.  Increase height 2″ for 2×12 framing.

 

To have a bedroom on the second floor of a 34′ dome, a fire egress casement window is installed in a door dormer NOT a second floor window dormer.  To have a door dormer on the second floor there must be a standard entryway below it.  The maximum size rough opening is 29″ x 42″ or 42″ x 29″.  Order casement window with egress hardware. 

A Second Floor Door Dormer can only be installed above a standard entryway. Due to the panel sizes in a 34′ dome, the second floor door dormer can only accept a custom door two feet wide by six feet tall.  Because of such a small door, this is why our web site states a second floor door dormer is not available on the 34′ dome.  However a second floor door dormer in stalled above a first floor standard entryway in a 34′ dome could be used to accept the required fire egress window.  This can be confusing, so please call for clarification…..321-639-8777.

2nd floor
dormer not
available use
solar tube
Fire Egress

RO 32″x42″ C

or RO 42″ x29″ C

order egress hardware

 

34′ 2nd floor door dormer only for fire egress window NOT WD
RO 29″x42″ C
or RO 42″x29″ C
order egress hardware

36 2nd floor door dormer only for fire egress window NOT WD

 

RO 29″x42″ C

RO 42″x 29″C

order egress hardware2/8 x 4/0 V

RO – 2/8 x 3/6 C

3/0 x 3/8 V2/4 x 3/5 C

3/4 x 3/0 V

3/8 x 2/8 H2/4 x 3/5 C

 

 

2nd Floor Door Dormer – Maximum Door Sizes.  First Floor ceiling height for 27′, 34′ and 36′ domes is 7′-6″.

22′ Dome
NA
27′ Dome
NA
30′   NA
34′ – 24″ x 60″
36′ Dome
24″ x 6/8
40′ Dome
2/6″ x 6/8
45′ Dome
2/6″ x 6/8
48′ Dome
3/0″ x 6/8

Cupola – Recommended Window Sizes – Horizontal Roller or Slider Type

22′
N/A
27′
5/6 x 2/0 H
2 – 2/8 x 2/0 H
30′
5/0 x 2/0 H
4/8 x 2/0 H
34′ & 36′
5/6 x 2/0 H
2 – 2/8 x 2/0 H
40′
7/0 x 2/0 H
2 – 3/4 x 2/0 H
45′
8/0 x 2/0 H
2 – 3/8 x 2/0 H
48′
8/0 x 2/0 H
2 – 4/0 x 2/0 H

Cupola windows can not qualify for egress because they are too high above the floor. Two standard vinyl horizontal roller or slide type windows are needed to fill one rough window opening of a cupola. They can be installed with a mullion in between them or custom windows can be installed.Florida and most other state’s code for Glass and Glazing requires tempered glass to be used in windows whose nearest edge is within 24″ radius of a door in closed position. Tempered glass is also required for glass panes with a bottom edge less than 18″ and a bottom greater than 36″ above the floor.

 

Maximum Rough Opening Sizes for Doors and/or Windows

Our Entryways and Dormers provide openings in the dome that accommodate conventional doors and windows that you purchase locally. The walls within these openings are built on-site to fit your choice of door and window sizes.

Typical heights (distance “D” from the floor to the top of the opening) are listed in the first column with the maximum available rough opening listed for each dome size.

Opening sizes are listed as Width x Height.

Entryway & High Profile Entryway – Maximum Size Rough Opening For Doors and/or Windows

D
22′
27′
30′
34’/36′
40′
45′
48′
Standard
80″
NA
NA
99″ x 82″
119″ x 82″
147″ x 82″
171″ x 82″
186″ x 82″
High Profile
96″
NA
NA
86″ x 96″
106″ x 96″
135″ x 96″
159″ x 96″
173″ x 96″

Garage Entryway – Maximum Garage Door Size

D
22′
27′
30′
34’/36′
40′
45′
48′
84″
9′ x 7′
16′ x 7′
12′ x 7′
14′ x 7′
16′ x 7′
n/a
n/a