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The following article covers Strength & Inside Edition FAQ.

Exterior garage pineapple

Above is the 22′ dome linked to 34′ dome that were under construction when Inside Edition Visited

These Domes Went Through Hurricane Jeanne and Frances with no damage.

While the roof was blown off the house across the street

 

Q: When the reporter from Inside Edition visited, what dome advantage did they zero in on?

A: The theme of the segment revolved around the super strength of American Ingenuity’s prefab concrete domes and how the Ai domes withstand hurricane forces. The reporter and two man camera crew first went to Miami, Florida and interviewed the owners of an American Ingenuity dome that survived a direct hit from hurricane Andrew. Views of the Menendezes’ beautiful interior were shown but the inspiring stories of the horse trailer and tornado slamming the dome got edited.  To view the Inside Edition video, view Inside Edition. Once you are on the page, scroll down and click on the second video which is the Inside Edition video.

They then drove up to our corporate offices. The segment went on to show our five dome complex including the  component panels being made in the factory.

The next stop was to view our domes under construction in Melbourne, Florida, a 34′ dome linked to a 22′ garage. Also of interest was the interior metal framing and metal floor joists.

The program director had previously asked us for a way to illustrate the domes’ ability to withstand hurricane force winds. Short of calling up a 200 mph wind and filming the real thing, the next best option is a computer finite analysis. The computer simulated a force equal to 230 mph winds. Our dome stood rock solid. In fact, to see the movement in the dome, the deflection had to be magnified 50 times. A square structure was also modeled but it collapsed with 150 mph winds.

A completed dome home was the next stop. After videoing the house and the dog dome, the reporter, Stephen Gendel, asked for an egg. While on screen he took his best shot at squeezing it to death. They departed shortly thereafter knowing that they had a good story and I can tell you with certainty, they were impressed.

About a week after the program aired we got a call from the New York office. They specifically called to tell us that they had received a flood of calls from people trying to get in touch with us. For viewers to call us directly they had to figure out the city and area code on their own. One lady reported that the long distance information operator knew our number by heart.

Q: Does American Ingenuity have an engineering statement about your dome panels that can be submitted to my building department?

A:  Yes, to view the statement click on Engineering.

Q: What wind loads will the dome withstand?
A:
Because the structure of our dome is steel reinforced concrete it is incredibly strong and easily enhanced to accommodate unusual requirements. The standard design will accommodate up to 225 mph. winds and category 4 tornadoes.  To view information summarizing Ai dome and hurricanes, view Hurricane Recap.

Two of American Ingenuity’s domes in Hawaii went through a 6.6 earthquake in 2006 and suffered no structural damage. To learn more about the earthquake, view ABC News Link and on MSNBC News Link.

The Ai dome design has proved itself by withstanding Hurricane Andrew’s 165 – 200 mph winds, a tornado that rolled up a steel horse trailer and slammed it against the Menendez dome, four hurricanes in 2004, 6.6 earthquake in 2006, sub-zero temperatures and heavy snow loads of the Northwest Territory of Canada, a 30″ in diameter 115 foot tall hickory tree impact, a lighting strike and many other conditions since 1976.

More about steel horse trailer impact: American Ingenuity warranties their concrete domes against 225 mph winds and F4 tornadoes. Since our dome kit manufacturing business started, Ai has sold 800 kits into 47 states and thirteen foreign areas. Since then Ai has not had any of our clients domes have any damage due to hurricanes or tornadoes except for one dome during Hurricane Andrew. During Andrew a tornado slammed a two wide metal horse trailer against  a 45’ American Ingenuity Dome.  A riser wall of the dome ended up with a hairline crack and a missing chunk of concrete. The dome owner caulked the crack and mixed up fiber concrete and filled area where the concrete was broken and painted over the area.

More about the tree impact: There was no damage to the Brack’s 48′ dome after winds in excess of 75 mph hit North Carolina in July of 1996. The real test came when a 115′ high, 30″ in diameter hickory tree was blown over and fell on their dome. The impact broke a 10″ diameter branch. The tree slid off and landed on a deck post driving it and it’s 16″ square concrete footer 6″ further into the ground. The insurance agent who inspected the damage to the deck conveyed his amazement about the dome’s strength with this comment, “If that had been a frame house the tree would have ended up in the basement!”

More about the lightning strike: American Ingenuity’s 45′ office dome withstood another one of nature’s most powerful forces, a LIGHTNING STRIKE. The lightning hit the outer edge of an entryway and the only damage it did to the dome was to knock off a handful of concrete at the point of impact! A couple of our computers have not been the same since, but the cost to repair the dome did not exceed $30 in materials and labor.

More about heavy snow loads: In 1995 Howard and Mary Carroll visited Robens and Tom Napolitan’s dome.  Robens was enthusiastic, but Tom was not. Tom explained to the Carroll’s, “its all HER idea, I didn’t want a dome.” Mary Carroll phoned the Napolitans in 1996.  Mrs. Carroll said you couldn’t keep Tom quiet this time.  He had nothing but wonderful things to say about the dome and had completely turned around about the wonders of living in an American Ingenuity dome…..ROOFS HAD COLLAPSED in their area under several feet of snow, but NOT HIS DOME! Tom’s turnaround sold Mary and her husband on an Ai dome.

Q: Have you performed a load test on your panel?  To view the load test file, view Load Test.
A:
Yes, in October 2000 Ai performed a load test on one of its 48′ dome building kit’s component panels. The test was performed on our largest house panel using the standard 7″ thick E.P.S. insulation, 3/4″ thick concrete exterior reinforced with steel mesh and fiber reinforced plaster on the interior. The strength of the component panel can be best be determined by measuring the deflection of the panel as a load (weight) is applied in increments. The panel was placed horizontally. Its weight and the weight of everything placed on it was only supported along the outer edge of the panel. The loading of the panel was done by adding sand in 470 lb. increments. Plywood sides were attached to the panel edges so the sand could be spread evenly, providing a uniform load.

The deflection was measured in the center and six other locations. At all the measured points a steel ruler was attached to the panel extending high enough to be visible when the panel was fully loaded with the sand. A surveyor’s transit allowed us to measure the deflection.

After 3,783 lbs. of sand was dumped on the panel its center had deflected less than 1/16 inch. Three days later the deflections had only increased to 3/32 inch. Our own amazement at the strength made us even more brave; so we cut through the interior plaster on the bottom of the panel. Even then the deflection was less than 3/16 inch.

We had not expected this exceptional strength. We could not mound the sand any higher so we set a pallet of 40 cement bags on top of the sand thinking, “This could do the panel in.” That doubled the weight on the panel and the center deflection increased to less than 3/8 inch. The grand total deflection of less than 3/8 inch with almost four tons of weight was astonishing to us.

A 120-mph wind will exert a pressure of 30 lbs. per sq.ft. on a vertical wall and a snow load exceeding 50 lbs. per sq.ft. is rare. Our panel withstood 170 lbs. per sq.ft.

Q: The prefabricated panel concrete is not that thick, why is American Ingenuity’s dome so strong?
A:
The panel concrete does not need to be thick because the strength comes from the triangle shape and the steel reinforced concreted seams which are about 5″ wide and 3″ deep averaging two thick concrete. Engineers tell us the seams act like steel beams and transfer any stress all over the dome instead of containing the stress in one spot.

TV

1)    Inside Edition:  On September 11, 1998, Inside Edition, a syndicated TV show led off with a segment on our geodesic domes.  The theme of the segment revolved around the super strength of our domes and how they withstand hurricane forces.  The reporter and two man camera crew first went to Miami and interviewed the owners of a dome that survived a direct hit from hurricane Andrew.  Views of the Menendezes’ beautiful interior were shown but the inspiring stories of the horse trailer and tornado slamming the dome got edited.  They then drove up to our corporate offices.  The segment went on to show our five dome complex including the component panels being made in the factory.  The next stop was to view domes under construction in Melbourne, a 34′ home linked to a 22′ garage.  Also of interest was the interior metal framing and metal floor joists.

    The program director had previously asked us for a way to illustrate the domes ability to withstand hurricane force winds.  Short of calling up a 200 mph wind and filming the real thing, the next best option is a computer finite analysis.  The computer simulated a force equal to 230 mph winds.  Our dome stood rock solid.  In fact, to see the movement in the dome, the deflection had to be magnified 50 times.  A square structure was also modeled but it collapsed with 150 mph winds.

    A completed dome home was the next stop.  After videoing the house and the dog dome, the reporter, Stephen Gendel, asked for an egg.  While on screen he took his best shot at squeezing it to death.  They departed shortly thereafter knowing that they had a good story and I can tell you with certainty, they were impressed.

    About a week after the program aired we got a call from the New York office.  They specifically called to tell us that they had received a flood of calls from people trying to get in touch with us.  For viewers to call us directly they had to figure out the city and area code on their own.  One lady reported that the long distance information operator knew our number by heart.

2)    Film Garden Entertainment of California put together a television program for Home and Garden TV and wanted to include our geodesic dome.  A TV crew spent a day filming our office and manufacturing facility along with two local dome residences.  They also interviewed Michael and Glenda for many hours about the dome concept, manufacturing and assembly of our domes.  The program Insiders List aired in August 2004.  The theme of the program was the top 10 innovative prefab homes throughout the world.  It ranged from “Wee Houses” in the Midwest that were 18′ x 24′ x 10′ to million dollar prefab penthouse modules placed on purchased rooftop spaces in London.  American Ingenuity was privileged to be ranked number 9 on the list.

 

Exterior Schoonover side front view 3

American Ingenuity 40′ dome home featured on Film Garden Entertainment

Film Garden Entertainment of California put together a television program for Home and Garden TV and wanted to include our geodesic dome.  A TV crew spent a day filming our office and manufacturing facility along with two local dome residences.  They also interviewed Michael and Glenda for many hours about the dome concept, manufacturing and assembly of our domes.  The program Insiders List aired in August 2004.  The theme of the program was the top 10 innovative prefab homes throughout the world.  It ranged from “Wee Houses” in the Midwest that were 18′ x 24′ x 10′ to million dollar prefab penthouse modules placed on purchased rooftop spaces in London.  American Ingenuity was privileged to be ranked number 9 on the list.

 

Different angle of above 40 ' dome linked to 30 garage dome.  Solar panel on top of link.

40 ‘ dome linked to 30 garage dome on Inside Edition.

 Inside Edition:  On September 11, 1998, Inside Edition, a syndicated TV show led off with a segment on our geodesic domes.  The theme of the segment revolved around the super strength of our domes and how they withstand hurricane forces.  The reporter and two man camera crew first went to Miami and interviewed the owners of a dome that survived a direct hit from hurricane Andrew.  Views of the Menendezes’ beautiful interior were shown but the inspiring stories of the horse trailer and tornado slamming the dome got edited.  They then drove up to our corporate offices.  The segment went on to show our five dome complex including the component panels being made in the factory.  The next stop was to view domes under construction in Melbourne, a 34′ home linked to a 22′ garage.  Also of interest was the interior metal framing and metal floor joists.

    The program director had previously asked us for a way to illustrate the domes ability to withstand hurricane force winds.  Short of calling up a 200 mph wind and filming the real thing, the next best option is a computer finite analysis.  The computer simulated a force equal to 230 mph winds.  Our dome stood rock solid.  In fact, to see the movement in the dome, the deflection had to be magnified 50 times.  A square structure was also modeled but it collapsed with 150 mph winds.

    A completed dome home was the next stop.  After videoing the house and the dog dome, the reporter, Stephen Gendel, asked for an egg.  While on screen he took his best shot at squeezing it to death.  They departed shortly thereafter knowing that they had a good story and I can tell you with certainty, they were impressed.

    About a week after the program aired we got a call from the New York office.  They specifically called to tell us that they had received a flood of calls from people trying to get in touch with us.  For viewers to call us directly they had to figure out the city and area code on their own.  One lady reported that the long distance information operator knew our number by heart.


Dome Consultant link from Video

How Does The American Ingenuity Geodesic Dome COMPARE TO THE MONOLITHIC DOME?

Are Aidomes as sturdy as Monolithic domes? Yes, our domes are as sturdy as Monolithic domes and Ai’s has a rigid noncombustible  concrete exterior vs Monolithic Dome has an outer membrane.   To view video of monolithic dome and a fire and info about Ai dome’s fire resistant concrete exterior, click on Ai Concrete Exterior.  The Aidome exterior comes with a 225 mph wind and EF4 Tornado Warranty.  One of Aidomes withstood the impact of a 30″ in diameter hickory tree impact with no damage.  An Aidome withstood Hurricane Andrew and a tornado at the same time with no structural damage – only a hairline crack and small piece of concrete broken when the tornado slammed a two wide steel horse trailer on the dome.  To view  strength info about Aidomes, click on Acts of Nature.   Why did Ai stop guniting concrete on to the exterior of its dome – too labor intensive and a waste of concrete.

The Ai dome exterior walls cost 1/3 to 1/2 less than a Monolithic dome exterior.  Although you have not asked, Aidomes are equally if not more energy efficient. Ai’s dome kit contains seven inch thick insulation which is comparable to eleven inches of fiberglass batting.

The assembly of the monolithic dome requires expensive concrete spraying equipment and is not a do-it-yourself project. The American Ingenuity Dome Kits were specifically designed for the owner builder. All of the panels are premarked with numbers and letters which are described in the Assembly Manual and on the Nomenclature Blueprint in the Building Plans.  Ai’s dome kits can be assembled using a mortar mixer, conventional cranes, man lift or hoisting mechanisms with no need to spray concrete over the entire dome surface. The Ai component panels already have 80% of the exterior prefinished concrete reinforced with galvanized steel mesh and fibers on the exterior. The Aidome kit requires less on site concrete work because it is only the seam areas between the component panels and the entryways and dormers which require concreting. The seam area between the panels is about 5” wide and 3” deep with the on site seam concrete application averaging two inches thick.  To view info about being an owner builder, click on DIY.

In 1976 American Ingenuity built its first geodesic dome utilizing reinforced concrete over expanded bead polystyrene (E.P.S.) insulation. Road mesh was hand tied onto propped up E.P.S. panels, the concrete was then gunited or pumped over the propped up E.P.S. insulation. Each time Ai built a dome this way, we knew there had to be a better way resulting in a prefabricated component panel being invented and receiving a patent.  Countless designs and manufacturing construction techniques were analyzed in the early years as Ai developed a new generation in dome housing. Ai has outgrown two previous models as we progressed to a five dome office and factory complex.

Spraying concrete on a structure causes a waste of labor and concrete. The concrete ends up being 2″ thick in one place and 3″ to 4″ thick in other places. The concrete on the Ai geodesic dome needs to be thick only in the seams and thin on the panels.  It is a waste of labor because it is difficult for the concrete finishers to finish the concrete as it is curing. Also a continuous sprayed concrete structure will cause the concrete to cure all at once.  Preconcreted panels allow for the panel concrete to cure prior to the seam concrete being applied.  For those homeowners who do not want to assemble the American Ingenuity dome kit themselves, the homeowner can hire a local builder who hires the independent kit assembly consultant to supervise the builder’s workers during the kit assembly.  To view our web site info about the Specialist/Consultant, please click on Specialist.

THERMAL MASS IN RELATION  TO MONOLITHIC DOMES

Generally speaking, in a home, thermal mass is the amount of stuff inside the house that retains heat. Although thermal mass accounts for the fact that some things have a greater “thermal capacity” to store heat than others, to understand its effect you can think of it as the total weight of everything contained in the house. With more thermal mass (heavy stuff) inside your house more heat will have to be added or removed to change the temperature. Expressed another way, if heat is not being added the temperature will be slower to change. Does Thermal Mass affect the energy efficiency of the house? NO.  As heat in the house is lost through walls, windows etc, the temperature drops.

The thermal mass releases (loans) heat into the house slowing down the temperature change. When the heating system turns on it must replace heat lost to the outside and it must also replace (pay back) the heat given off by the thermal mass. There is no long-term gain or loss; all of the heat given off by the thermal mass must be replaced. The amount of heat required to maintain the temperature inside a house is solely dependent on the amount of heat that escapes to the outside. All houses have walls, floors, and usually fixtures, appliances and stuff that will retain heat. A large amount of thermal mass can cause long on/off cycles of the heating system when shorter cycles would stir the air more frequently providing more comfort and uniform temperatures inside.

The recent generation of thermostats are a proven money saver by lowering the inside temperature (which lowers the heat loss to the outside) during those hours you are away at work, etc.  A large thermal mass makes it much harder to change the temperature; therefore reducing the savings.

Why is the Ai dome so energy efficient?  

Ai’s kit has standard 7″ thick EPS R28 insulation. The cost to build one of our kits runs about the same to build as a traditional home but our home has insulation comparable to 11” of fiberglass batting!  (using the 7″ EPS).  A traditional house would require 2×10 to come close to our dome….but it would have wood interrupting the insulation.  The thick insulation, reduced exterior surface area (30% less surface area than conventional shaped home) and uninterrupted insulation causes low cooling and low heating bills.

As far as functioning in cold, snowy environment, American Ingenuity domes have been built in such cold climates as Canada, at 7,500 feet elevation in Utah, 3,400 feet elevation in North Carolina, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Wisconsin, Vermont, New York and all cold states in the USA except for New Hampshire, Rhode Island and North Dakota.  It is easier to heat an Ai dome that to cool one. To heat the furnace does not need to overcome heat generated from sunlight, clothes dryer, dish washer, body heat, light fixtures.

Below are examples of heating and cooling info on Aidomes.

  1. To view Glenda’s 1,075 sq. ft. dome home’s electric bill please view 34′ Dome Home Energy Recap   (total electric house with solar hot water panel – has actual copies of the electric bills).  I can cool my 1,075 sq.ft house for less than $27 a month in the hot Florida summer months.  (76 degrees when home and 79 degrees when not). As we discussed the Ai dome is even easier to heat than to cool.  To Heat you do not have to overcome sunlight, heat generated by the clothes dryer, dishwasher, computer, etc. This generated heat is utilized.
  2. Ai’s dome offices of 3,700 sq.ft. can be cooled for less than $85 a month (you can view actual electric bills at this link) in the hot Florida summer months to 74 degrees during the day Mon-Sat and 77 degrees at night and on Sunday.
  3. One of our domes built in South Carolina received the Energy Star  It has geothermal pipes.  Home Energy Partners certified his home used 61% less energy than in comparably-size housing.   The dome owner installed a geothermal cooling & heating system. To view pictures & info about his geothermal system, click on System.  Klaus’s total monthly average energy bill was $49. This includes the electricity and propane costs for his entire 1,600 sq.ft. – 40 ft. dome.
  4. Here is a quote from the Charles family about their PA 40 dome on full basement with Geothermal and radiant floor heating:  Mr. & Mrs. Charles: ““We live in the mountains of PA. The winters up here can be brutal. Our Ai Dome is a 40ft with Link on a 9″ thick livable basement. {Den, Office/Computer room, Kitchenette} The entire interior, to include the mechanical room, is heated and cooled by a Geothermal, Water furnace, Radiant floor system. Our zone controllers are set on 74 degrees winter and summer. Our sole power source, at present, is the grid. Our costs per month range from $99 to a high of $120. We were amazed that our cost now are less than when we lived in a 14 by 73 ft. mobile home while building the Dome. Our decision to build an American Ingenuity Dome home was the best decision we have ever made.”
  5. Jim Collar’s Utah Ai concrete dome buildings (45 linked to a 30’) operate off the grid by using photovoltaics’, masonry heater fireplace and passive solar water tubes. To learn more, click on  Off The Grid.
  6. Per Eric Brindley, “Our 2,600 sq.ft. 48’ dome located in Edgewater Florida is very efficient and strong. It has been hit by several hurricanes and tropical storms with no damage at all. My neighbor’s conventional house was severely damaged by the storms. I keep the house at 72 degrees in the summer and warmer in winter. My electric bill is around $100 a month with no water/sewer bill because I’m on well/septic.”
  7. If a person does not need to air condition their home, then if window dormers or windows within entryways are placed opposite each other cross ventilation can occur and cool the dome.  Our factory has three Ai domes which are not air conditioned.  In the heat of the Florida summers, you can walk in the domes and they are cooler than the outside air.  Floor fans circulate the air.  The super insulated dome is cooler inside with no air conditioning than a conventional house.
  8. Glenda owned a 34’ dome built at 3,400 feet elevation that could reach -8 degrees in the winter. Its south facing high profile entryway allowed sunlight to come in the dome.  When we wanted to carry wood and burn the fireplace, the fireplace and the sunlight from the entryway was enough to heat the dome.  At night we utilized a kerosene feed heater set at 68 degrees and the fire place for heat. During the winter we would use around 100 gallons of kerosene.
  9. Yes a fireplace can be installed in the dome.  Just let us know about where you want it located and our CAD department with use its 3D elevation view to locate the flue pipe’s exit from the dome.  It needs to be 8” from the center of a seam. On site a hole can be cut in the prefab panel.  Instructions on how to cut the hole are in the Assembly Manual.

The following info covers American Ingenuity’s Garage Domes which have R28 insulation. The 27′, 34′, 36′, 40′, 45′ & 48′ domes can be designed as a garage on the first floor with a second floor studio above.  If the entire second floor is built within a 27′, 34′ or 36′ or 40′ dome, the second floor could be designed for a studio apartment with one bedroom, one bath & kitchenette.  Due to the load of the second floor there could be a post in the center of the first floor if microlam beams are not designed to carry the second floor load.  The 40′, 45′ & 48′ dome’s second floor is large enough to have two bedrooms and one full bath with kitchenette.  

(Click arrows left/right in main picture)

American Ingenuity’s 22’ & 27’ domes were specifically designed for garages. The 22′ is a one car garage dome with 9′ wide garage door.  The 27′ is a two medium car garage with 16′ wide garage door.  27′ dome can have a second floor for a one bedroom, one bath studio apartment. These garage domes are two-frequency icosahedron geometry whereas the domes (30′, 34′, 36′, 40′, 45′ & 48′) are three-frequency icosahedron geometry. The two frequency geometry differs from our other domes in that the 22′ & 27′ utilize fewer but larger panels.    For Ai to assure that the vehicle(s) you desire to park in your garage dome will fit, please give us your vehicle length, width, height and hood height.  At no cost to you, our design team will provide a plan proof  showing the vehicle sizes and whether they will fit or not.

Due to the size of the 22′ – 40′ domes three risers can be removed instead of two in order to have a wider entryway.  Due to the large size of the 45′ & 48′ dome only two risers can be removed for an entryway.  Because the 22′ & 27′ have fewer but larger panels than the three frequency domes, their risers are wider resulting in the 22′ dome  accepting a 9′ wide garage door. The 27′ dome can have a 16′ wide garage door.  Previously a 34’ dome was needed to pull two small to medium cars in side by side. Now there can be a two-car garage in a 27’ dome, which is more cost effective.  Either of these garage domes can be connected to another dome via a link that is one riser panel wide or the garage dome can be built independently from the house dome.

Garage Entryways take the place of three riser panels whereas standard and high profile entryways replace two risers. The 45′ & 48′ dome cannot have garage entryways due to their large size.

The 22′ and 27′ Garage Entryway panels are larger in size than the other dome entryways and are not preconcreted. The 22′ and 27′ entryway panels consist of 3 1/2″ EPS as the rigid form with no steel mesh or concrete applied.  The dome buyer can purchase galvanized steel mesh from Ai and at no cost Ai will affix the mesh to the 22′ or 27′ garage entryway panels.  On site fiber concrete is mixed and hand troweled to all sides of the entryway panels after their installation.

An Ai dome building kit includes all the panels for the dome shell and includes the panels for one entryway.  Each floor plan varies as to the number of entryways and dormers.  As a result the kit pricing only reflects the type and number of entryways and dormers that you chose to have in your floor plan.  The following Plan’s Price does not include an engineer seal, structural calculations or energy report.  If those items are required by your building department they can be purchased from Ai for a reasonable fee.

To view Discount on the building plans and the kit with one entryway, please click on Sale.  To view stock plans for these Garage Kits and stock floor plan layouts for dome homes for each of the ten dome kit sizes, click on Stock Plans. To view Sale Pricing on the Building Plans and the Dome Kit for each plan, click on Plans and Kit Sale Pricing.

Stock Dome Plan Name

Second floor can be built in 27′, 30′, 34′, 36′, 40′, 45′ & 48′

Building Options Plans Price without sale discount Kit with Option Price without sale discount R28 insulation

 

22 Gamma 1 Garage
1 Entryway, one 1st Floor Door Dormer
$1,134  $21,665
27 Gamma 1 Garage
1 Entryway, one 1st Floor Door Dormer
$1,134  $28,409
30 Gamma 1 Garage
1 Entryway, one 1st Floor Door Dormer
 $1,198  $31,739
34 Gamma 1 Garage
2 Entryways, three 2nd Floor Window Dormers
 $1,261  $38,506
36 Garage w’ studio
1 Entryway, one 1st Floor Door Dormer, 5 WD
$1,294  $41,989
40 Garage w’ 1 Bedroom
1 G type Entry, 1 Standard Entry, 1 DD, 4 WD
 $1,333  $48,471
45 Garage – approx. plan
1 G type Entry, 1 DD, 3 WD
 $1,427  $55,828
48 Garage – approx. plan
1 G type Entry, 1DD,  3WD
 $1,514  $61,556

Garage Domes w’ Second Floor Studio Apartments

Garage Dome Stock Floor Plans

GARAGE DOME, 22’: has 370 sq.ft. on the first floor and is designed for a one-car garage. A 9’ wide x 7′ tall garage door can fit in the garage entryway. There can be a loft area for storage. Due to small size of the second floor panels, the loft area cannot have any window or door dormers.  A link connected to a 22′ dome is about 5.5 feet to 6 feet wide with a standard length of five feet.

Garage Dome, 27’: has 555 sq.ft. on the first floor sq.ft. and is designed for a two medium car garage. It can have a 16’ wide garage door in the garage entryway. The second floor center height is 8′ 4″ sloping down to five feet to equal 231 sq.ft. on the second floor.  The second floor can have  window dormers but no door dormers. The second floor can have fire egress window; therefore the second floor can have a bedroom.  A link connected to a 27′ dome is about 6.75 feet wide with a standard length of five feet.

Garage Dome, 30’: has 638 sq.ft. on the first floor and is designed for two small cars with the cars pulling in one at a time and each car parking on a diagonal. The 30’ garage door is 12’ wide. The second floor center height is 7’4″ sloping down to five feet to equal 213 sq.ft. on the second floor.  Due to small size of dome’s second floor panels the second floor cannot have window or door dormers.  Therefore no bedroom can be designed on the 30′ second floor.

Garage Dome, 34’: has 846 sq.ft. on the first floor and is designed for a two-car garage with the garage door being 14’ wide. The second floor center height is 9’5″ sloping down to five feet of head room to equal 427 sq.ft. on the second floor.  The second floor can have window dormers & door dormers.  If balcony desired the door size is 2′ x 6′ tall with this door being custom cut on site.  The second floor can have a bedroom and bath.  For fire egress second floor window to fit a second floor door dormer has to be installed above a standard entryway. Instead of installing a door a fire egress size casement window is installed.

Garage Dome, 36′: has 940 sq.ft. on first floor and is designed for a two-car garage with the garage door being 14′ wide. The second floor center height is 10′ 4″ sloping down to five feet to equal 470 sq.ft. on the second floor.  The second floor can have window dormers & door dormers. If balcony desired the door size is 2’x6’8″ and is custom ordered. The second floor can have fire egress size window & is large enough to have a bedroom with bath.

Garage Dome, 40′: has 1,160 sq.ft. on the first floor and can be designed for a three to four car garage depending on the vehicle sizes. It would require two garage doors, each could be 16′ wide. Each set of two cars would share one garage door. The second floor center height is 10’4″ sloping down to five feet to equal 667 sq.ft. on the second floor.  The second floor can have fire egress windows and door dormers above standard entryways.  The second floor is large enough to contain two bedrooms and one bath.

Garage Dome, 45′: has 1,489 sq.ft. on the first floor and can be designed for a three to four car garage depending on the vehicle sizes and entryway locations.  It would require two garage doors, each 13′ wide.  The second floor center height is 13’7″ sloping down to five feet to equal 951 sq.ft. if the second floor is maxed out.  The second floor can have fire egress windows and door dormers above standard entryways.  The second floor is large enough to contain three bedrooms and one bath.

Garage Dome, 48′:   has 1,693 sq.ft. on the first floor and can be designed for a three to four car garage depending on the vehicle sizes and entryway locations.  It would require two garage doors, each 14′ wide.  The second floor center height is 14’10” sloping down to five feet to equal 1,137 sq.ft. if the second floor is maxed out.  The second floor can have fire egress windows and door dormers above standard entryways.  The second floor is large enough to contain three bedrooms and one bath.

Q: What is the tallest and widest garage door you can have and in what size dome?
A:
Current designs allow for a 16′ wide 9′ tall garage door in a 40′ dome with a 4′ risers with additional 2′ risers.  A 27′ dome because it is two frequency can have 16′ wide garage door 7′ tall with a four foot riser.

Q: Can the 45′ and 48′ domes be designed for a garage dome?
A:
Yes.The standard entryway in the 45′ with 4′ risers can have a 13′ wide x 7′ tall garage door for a two car garage. The cars would go in and out of the garage one at a time. In a 48′ dome there can be a 14′ wide garage door in a standard entryway and the cars come and go two at a time.  Due to the large size of the domes for structural integrity three risers cannot be removed ONLY two.    If the 45′ or 48′ dome are built with two foot additional risers the garage door for a 45′ can be 13′ x 9′ or 15′ x 7′.  The Garage door for the 48′ dome can be 14′ x 9′ or 16′ x 7′.

Q: What is the cost to build a garage dome?
A:
The cost to build a dome garage would be about the same as the cost of a garage for a conventional house. Whatever it costs per square foot in your neighborhood to build a conventional garage that will be the approximate cost to build the dome garage.  The construction cost will increase if a bedroom and bath is installed on the second floor above the garage.

Q: Are garage plans priced separately from the other plans?
A:
Yes since every building site is different, Garage & Basement Plans are priced separately from the dome home plans. Ai has Stock Plans for garages which may be linked to any dome where indicated or may be built separately. Or Ai can design custom garage plans.

This article discusses some of the awards & recognition
American Ingenuity Concrete Domes have received.
40' dome on right linked to 30' dome.

40′ concrete dome on right linked to 30′ dome.  Featured on front cover of Popular Science Magazine in 1987.  Dome also won award for “Most Energy Efficient Residence” in southeastern USA

 

34' dome on left linked to 45' dome.

34′ dome on left linked to 45′ dome.  American Ingenuity Office domes have been featured on TV & in newspaper articles.

 

27' garage dome with garage door up.....can park two medium size vehicles.

27′ garage dome with garage door up…..can park two medium size vehicles. These domes were awarded EPA’s Energy Star ranking.

Through the years, American Ingenuity Domes have been featured in many magazine articles, books, newspaper articles and television programs.

Television Coverage:

1)    Inside Edition:  On September 11, 1998, Inside Edition, a syndicated TV show led off with a segment on our geodesic domes.  The theme of the segment revolved around the super strength of our domes and how they withstand hurricane forces.  The reporter and two man camera crew first went to Miami and interviewed the owners of a dome that survived a direct hit from hurricane Andrew.  Views of the Menendezes’ beautiful interior were shown but the inspiring stories of the horse trailer and tornado slamming the dome got edited.  They then drove up to our corporate offices.  The segment went on to show our five dome complex including  component panels being made in the factory.  The next stop was to view domes under construction in Melbourne, a 34′ home linked to a 22′ garage.  Also of interest was the interior metal framing and metal floor joists.

The program director had previously asked us for a way to illustrate the domes ability to withstand hurricane force winds.  Short of calling up a 200 mph wind and filming the real thing, the next best option is a computer finite analysis.  The computer simulated a force equal to 230 mph winds.  Our dome stood rock solid.  In fact, to see the movement in the dome, the deflection had to be magnified 50 times.  A square structure was also modeled but it collapsed with 150 mph winds.

A completed dome home was the next stop.  After videoing the house and the dog dome, the reporter, Stephen Gendel, asked for an egg.  While on screen he took his best shot at squeezing it to death.  They departed shortly thereafter knowing that they had a good story and I can tell you with certainty, they were impressed.

About a week after the program aired we got a call from the New York office.  They specifically called to tell us that they had received a flood of calls from people trying to get in touch with us.  For viewers to call us directly they had to figure out the city and area code on their own.  One lady reported that the long distance information operator knew our number by heart.

2)    Film Garden Entertainment of California put together a television program for Home and Garden TV and wanted to include our geodesic dome.  A TV crew spent a day filming our office and manufacturing facility along with two local dome residences.  They also interviewed Michael and Glenda for many hours about the dome concept, manufacturing and assembly of our domes.  The program Insiders List aired in August 2004.  The theme of the program was the top 10 innovative prefab homes throughout the world.  It ranged from “Wee Houses” in the Midwest that were 18′ x 24′ x 10′ to million dollar prefab penthouse modules placed on purchased rooftop spaces in London.  American Ingenuity was privileged to be ranked number 9 on the list.

Magazine coverage:
• A cover story in Popular Science in March 1987
• Builder Dealer Magazine in November 1987
• Ambassador Magazine for Trans World Airlines in May 1990
• American Survival Guide magazine in January 1991 and September 1995
• Aberdeen’s Concrete Construction magazine in March 1996
• Home Power magazine in June/July 1998

Book coverage:
• Future Stuff
• Xtreme Houses by Courtenay Smith & Sean Topham. Prestel Verlag offices are in Munich, Berlin, London, New York 2002

Newspaper Coverage: (to read some of these articles click on Newspaper)
• Numerous articles written by syndicated columnist James Dulley
• Florida Today
• Detroit News
• Asheville Citizen Times January 19, 2006 (North Carolina)
• International Herald Tribune December 10-11, 2005 (Hong Kong)
• The New York Times January 11, 2007
• The Florida Keys Sunday January 28, 2007
• Jamaica-Gleaner August 26, 2007